Genitourinary Assays

We offer an extensive range of assays in human genitourinary tissues including uterus, bladder, prostate, ureter and urethra. Our scientists can estimate the therapeutic efficacy of potential new therapies or assess the likelihood of off-target effects in these tissues.

wire-myograph-01

Diagram of the organ bath model used for our Genitourinary studies. 


Uterine Contractility

Alterations to the function of the uterus may have adverse effects on human health (pregnancy, dysmenorrhea etc.). Our uterine contractility model uses fresh, functional human uterine tissue to determine whether your test article causes contraction or relaxation of this organ. 

  • Both IC50 and pAcan be determined
  • Three reference compounds available (vasopressin, oxytocin, and phenylephrine)
  • Test article effect can be assessed in the presence of an antagonist
  • Safety assessments can be conducted in accordance with GLP regulations
  • Rat uterine tissues can be used to provide a comparison with human uterine tissue

Uterus-1

Example of fresh uterine tissue used for our uterine contractility studies.

Uterine contractility (vasopressin)
Determine whether your test article affects uterine contractility via vasopressin receptors. 

Vasopressin-Vasopressin receptor →

Uterine contractility (oxytocin)
Determine whether your test article affects uterine contractility via oxytocin receptors. 

Oxytocin-Oxytocin receptor →

Rat Uterine contractility (oxytocin)
Determine whether your test article affects rat uterine contractility via oxytocin receptors. Can be used in comparative studies to investigate species differences. 


Uterine Relaxation

In addition to measuring uterine contraction, we can also assess the relaxation effects of your test article on uterine tissue. A range of reference compounds can be used to assess relaxation including isoprenaline, isradipine, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). 

Uterine relaxation (SNP)
Discover whether your test article affects uterine relaxation via nitric oxide donors, with SNP as a reference compound.

Sodium nitroprusside model →

Uterine relaxation (isoprenaline)
Discover whether your test article affects uterine relaxation via adrenoceptors, with isoprenaline as a reference compound.

Isoprenaline model →

Uterine relaxation (isradipine)
Discover whether your test article affects uterine relaxation via calcium channels, with isradipine as a reference compound.

Isradipine model →


Bladder contraction and relaxation

The primary function of the bladder is to store urine before micturition. Alterations to the contraction and relaxation of the bladder can affect filling and emptying, causing disorders such as incontinence and bladder hypertrophy. We can assess the effect of your test article on bladder smooth muscle tone using fresh functional bladder tissues.

  • Both EC/IC50 and pAcan be determined
  • Electrical field stimulation (EFS) can be used to activate nerves that cause bladder contraction
  • Reference compounds available include carbachol, isoproterenol, and retigabine

Bladder tissue 2

Example of fresh bladder tissue used in our bladder contractility studies.

Bladder relaxation 
Discover whether your test article affects bladder relaxation via adrenoceptors, with isoproterenol as a reference compound.

Isoproterenol model →

Bladder contraction
Discover whether your test article affects bladder contraction via muscarinic receptors, with carbachol as a reference compound.

Carbachol model →

Modulation of neuronally induced contractions (EFS) of the bladder
Discover whether your test article affects bladder contraction induced by electrical field stimulation. 

Muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptor model →


Ureter relaxation

The ureter is a structure that connects the kidneys to the bladder. It has a smooth muscle layer that propels urine to the bladder via peristalsis. Our organ bath system can be used to assess the effect of your test article on ureter relaxation (or contraction). 

Ureter

An example of human ureter sections isolated in our Glasgow laboratory.

Human ureter relaxation 
Assess whether your test article causes relaxation of the ureters, with phenylephrine as a reference compound.

Adrenoceptor-phenylephrine model →


Urethra contraction

The urethra is essential for the excretion of urine and semen. Any changes to the urethra, such as prostate hypertrophy, can affect the passage of these substances. We can assess the effects of your test article on the contraction (or relaxation) of the human urethra using our organ bath system. 

Urethra contraction model 
Assess whether your test article causes contraction of the urethra, with phenylephrine as a reference compound.

Adrenoceptor-phenylephrine model →

 

Have a question about our genitourinary assays? Fill out the form below to contact a member of our human tissue team.